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Annotated Curricular Resources on Child Labor

Caution: Children at Work

Authors/educators
Research/writing by David Radcliff; fact sheet design by Eunice Cudzewicz
Organization/publisher
Church World Service
Primary audience
Church groups; adults and children
Curriculum and content
“Study/action guide” provides brief overview of current child labor statistics, causes of problem, and current initiatives (YMCA programs, RUGMARK) under way to combat it. Information focuses on children gaining their own voice, organizing through CWS partner groups like MANTHOC, and programs like Free the Children that enlist the support of children in establishing education and rehabilitation services. Guide concludes with suggestions for action, a brief list of recommended readings and videos, and a short set of discussion questions for use in group meetings or for use with children.
Contact
Church World Service, 1-800-297-1516, www.churchworldservice.org / Eunice Cudzewicz, Medical Mission Sisters, 8400 Pine Rd., Philadelphia, PA 19111-1398

Child Labor (George Meany Memorial Archives Teacher’s Guides)

Organization/publisher
George Meany Center for Labor Studies – National Labor College, in collaboration with the Child Labor Coalition
Date of production/publication
2000
Primary audience
Elementary and secondary school students and teachers
Curriculum and content
Guide consists of series of classroom activities designed to accompany the article “Stolen Dreams: Portraits of the World’s Working Children,” by David Parker, published in Labor’s Heritage, Summer 1994 and the Labor’s Heritage “Children without a Childhood” poster. Guide is organized into five sections:
  1. “Child Labor in the United States” includes two contemporary examples of child labor in the U.S., federal laws in place to protect children, and questions for class discussion
  2. “Child Labor in Other Countries” gives two contemporary examples of child labor abuses in other countries, summary of international child labor laws and the problem of enforcing existing laws, and brief discussion questions
  3. “Child Labor: A Historical Perspective” provides guide to analyzing photographs and asks students to compare three contemporary child labor photographs by David Parker paired with three historical photographs of Lewis Hine using suggested questions, and to list reasons why American children left children to work in the early 1900s
  4. “Vocabulary and Geography” lists terms and places to introduce as part of the lesson
  5. “Bibliography” lists additional resources.
Contact
Lynda de Loach, Labor in the Schools, George Meany Memorial Archives, 10000 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD, (301) 431-5441, www.georgemeany.org/archives/labor.html

Child Labor: An Information Kit for Teachers, Educators and Their Organizations

Authors/educators
Natalie Drew and Yayoi Segi
Organization/publisher
International Labor Organization/International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour (IPEC)
Date of production/publication
1998
Primary audience
Teachers primarily, but authors recommend teachers use the materials for community education (especially with parents) or teacher training, and that teachers’ organizations, boards of education, religious/church groups, NGOs, community groups, trade unions, and employers’ organizations could all use parts of the kit in educational programs or advocacy work.
Curriculum and content
Kit contains two books, posters, a video, and examples of stories, games, drama plays, and stickers that can be developed/adapted by teachers for local use. Book 1, Child Labour, Children’s Rights and Education, gives facts about child labor and emphasizes the importance of education in eliminating child labor. Book 2, Combating Child Labour – Action by Teachers, Educators and their Organizations, gives examples of 13 successful initiatives to combat child labor in different countries, also emphasizing the centrality of educational programs. The kit is designed to provide basic information and models for advocacy strategies that can be modified and implemented based on local issues and conditions. Emphasis is placed on compliance with ILO and other international conventions regarding child labor, and IPEC programs are featured as examples of solutions. As the title indicates, this is primarily an “information kit” for adult self-education rather than a curriculum, but the end of each section in Book 1 does contain two sets of discussion topics on information covered; one set of questions is for use with adult colleagues, and one is for use with students/children. Several of the pages and graphics in both books could also be appropriate for reproduction as handouts or overheads.
Contact
IPEC, International Labor Office, CH-1211, Geneva, Switzerland, +41.22.799.8181, +41.22.799.8771 (fax), ipec@ilo.org

Child Labor Activity

Organization/publisher
Spartacus Educational and the International School of Toulouse
Primary audience
Elementary school students and teachers
Curriculum and content
Classroom web-based activity on the history of child labor, primarily in Britain. Activity page links to pages containing primary source material needed for use in a classroom debate activity and a research page containing a series of questions for students to answer using source material.
Contact
John Simkin, spartacus@pavilion.co.uk, www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk

Child Labor Around the World: Special Issues Online

Organization/publisher
Scholastic, in collaboration with the International Labor Rights Fund (ILRF) and In the Best Interest of Children (ITBIOC)
Date of production/publication
2001-2002
Primary audience
Elementary school students and teachers
Curriculum and content
Classroom web-based educational materials including research and photos reproduced from ILRF reports and country reports and profiles of child laborers generated by Scholastic News Zone editors. Materials are designed to supplement articles planned for publication in Scholastic News and Junior Scholastic classroom magazines. Site currently features children working in tobacco fields in Turkey and links to past reports on Indonesia, Mexico, and the Global March in India, a world map of child labor, an on-line quiz (focused on Mexico report), and a page of examples of what U.S. school children are doing to help child laborers. The site also links to related reference articles from the Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia and The New Book of Knowledge. Future country reports and profiles are to be added to the site on a regular basis throughout 2002. “Teacher Tips” page provides discussion questions for use with the child labor map, and general suggestions for using on-line materials in the classroom.
Contact
Scholastic, 557 Broadway, New York NY 10012, 212-343-6100, www.scholastic.com

Child Labor is Not Cheap

Authors/educators
Amy Sanders and Meredith Sommers, with David Bacon, Joyce Bowers, Audrey Conant, Pan Costain, Pam Harens, Le Lucht, Steve Sandell, Lynn Schultz, Syelly Swayze, Mary Swenson, Larry Weiss, and editing/design by Chip Mitchell
Organization/publisher
Resource Center of the Americas
Date of production/publication
1997
Primary audience
Grades 8-12 and adults
Curriculum and content
Forty-page book contains a three-lesson unit with reproducible handouts, posters, and worksheets, short readings, research project assignments, and role play guides. Unit I gives an overview of the problem of child labor, with a focus on agriculture and export-sector sweatshop labor. Unit II is a case study centered on an extensive role play scenario asking participants to make decisions from the points of view of various stakeholders in a transnational U.S. garment company’s overseas operations. Unit III focuses on solutions, models of effective youth and consumer action in the United States, and guides participants through the design of their own action plan.
Contact
Resource Center of the Americas, 3019 Minnehaha Ave., Minneapolis, MN 55406, 612-276-0788, 612-276-0898 (fax), bookstore@americas.org, www.americas.org

Child Labor: ILO’s Virtual Classroom

Organization/publisher
International Labor Organization, Washington Branch Office
Date of production/publication
1998 (revised 2000)
Primary audience
Elementary, high school, and college students and teachers
Curriculum and content
Home page contains links to resource pages with basic information and links to other parts of the ILO’s web site or to other child labor sites. One set of “ILO Kids” pages is geared toward elementary students; the other page, “Child Labor 101,” is geared toward high school and college students. Elementary site invites students to submit poems and artwork and contains basic information and a “What We Can Do” link; high school and college site invites students to send an on-line letter to the ILO Director-General and link to information about student activists. Focus is on Convention 182 Ratification campaigns.
Contact
International Labor Organization, 1828 L Street NW - #600, Washington DC 20036, 202-653-7652, 202-653-7687 (fax), http://us.ilo.org/ilokidsnew

Child Labor in America

Authors/educators
Joyce Kasman Valenza and Carl Atkinson
Organization/publisher
Library of Congress, American Memory Fellows Program
Date of production/publication
2000
Primary audience
Elementary and secondary school teachers and students
Curriculum and content
On-line unit on the history of child labor in the United States designed to fit 2-3 weeks of hour-long class periods in U.S. history, social studies, economics, literature, and/or art classes. Contains five activities, ranging from discussion, primary source analysis projects, photo/image analysis, and group research and presentation projects. On-line pages link directly to several primary archival sources and photos needed to complete activities. Concludes with a list of “extension activities,” or ideas for longer reading or research projects, field trips, and investigations.
Contact
The Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave. SE, Washington DC 20540, 202- 707-5000, http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpedu/lessions/98/labor/plan.html

Child Labor in Domestic Service

Authors/educators
Airyn de Tenorio (manual); Hella-Karin Alikuru (seminar facilitator)
Organization/publisher
ILO Bureau for Workers’ Activities (ACTRAV)
Date of production/publication
1998
Primary audience
Trade unionists and human rights activists
Curriculum and content
Instructional manual based on a 1998 IUF/ILO seminar held in Nairobi, Kenya on how trade unions can combat child labor in domestic service. Manual is divided into six sections:
  1. addresses general issue of child labor and demographics of child labor in Africa
  2. focuses on working, living, and socio-economic conditions of child laborers in domestic service sector
  3. reviews national and international legal framework, including ILO, national, and international legislation
  4. reviews national and international policy-making strategies and how trade unions can use legal mechanisms in efforts to eliminate child labor
  5. addresses policy development within trade unions and areas where trade unions can concentrate efforts
  6. presents action plans and strategies based on current trade union action, work of NGOs, Kenyan Ministry of Labor, and other sources.
Manual concludes with a guide to planning a one-day child labor seminar, which includes a model training agenda, facilitator notes, handouts, slideshows, and groups activity ideas (disk containing handouts and slide shows is available on request). Model program is designed to be adapted for use by unions in other industries and countries.
Contact
Bureau for Workers Activities, International Labour Office, 4, route des Morillons, CH-1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland, actrav@ilo.org

Child Labor: It is Everywhere

Authors/educators
Clara Oleson
Organization/publisher
University of Iowa Labor Center
Date of production/publication
2001
Primary audience
Union members
Curriculum and content
Course manual, overhead transparencies, and reading/resource list to accompany a one-hour popular education presentation on child labor. Course manual and transparencies cover definitions of child labor, overview of types of work children perform, statistics on international child labor, and and introduction to the International Labor Organization and international conventions relevant to child labor. Examples covered include child slavery in Haiti and the Ivory Coast, bonded labor in India, child trafficking in Africa and Asia, child soldiering, and child labor in U.S. agriculture.
Contact
University of Iowa Labor Center, M210 Oakdale Hall, Iowa City, IA 52242-5000, (319) 335-4144, (319) 335-4464 (FAX), www.uiowa.edu/~laborctr

Child Labor: The Shame of a Nation

Organization/publisher
Golden Owl
Date of production/publication
1997
Primary audience
Teachers and students, grades 7-12
Curriculum and content
Twelve black-and-white photographs of early twentieth-century American child laborers by Lewis Hine and Jacob Riis, accompanied by an 11-page teacher’s guide with background information, discussion questions, ideas for research/writing assignments, and short bibliography.
Contact
Social Studies School Service, 10200 Jefferson Blvd., Box 802, Culver City, CA 90232, access@socialstudies.com, www.socialstudies.com, 800-421-4246

Child Soldiers

Organization/publisher
Asian Human Rights School, Hong Kong
Date of production/publication
2000
Primary audience
Adults and community groups
Curriculum and content
This module on child soldiers is Chapter 8 in the Asian Human Rights Commission’s on-line human rights correspondence course (see www.hrschool.org). The module contains three brief lessons:
  1. Who are the child soldiers
  2. What are the rights which have been violated
  3. Suggestions for action
Lesson 3 is the longest, and includes long lists of initiatives preventing children from being recruited as soldiers, demobilizing and reintegrating child soldiers into society, and lessons learned from existing programs. Also includes a resource list and appendix with text excerpted from relevant UN documents.
Contact
Asian Human Rights School, www.hrschool.org, hrschool@ahrchk.org / Justice and Peace Commission, Archdiocese of Bombay, Catholic Communication Centre, Archbishop's House, 21, Nathalal Parekh Marg, Bombay 400 001, INDIA. (91-22) 281 9219 (fax)

Education for All Campaign Action Kit

Organization/publisher
Earth Action Network, with funding from European Community, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Finnish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Progressio Foundation, Fondazione Rispetto e Parità, and Humanitatian Group for Social Development
Date of production/publication
2002
Primary audience
Adults, NGOs, community groups
Curriculum and content
Kit provides resources for use in publicizing and participating in campaign to ratify, fund, and implement provisions of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Child labor is not the primary focus, but is mentioned as one of the key reasons poor children are denied education (this campaign will be followed over the next two years by campaigns focused on specific articles of the CRC, including Article 28 on Child Soldiers, Article 32 on Child Labour, and Article 20 on Street Children). Kit contains reproducible background information handouts on Education for All, the CRC, and Girls’ Education; postcards and information on contacting parliaments/congress; a sample press release; and a poster.
Contact
Earth Action, 30 Cottage Street, Amherst MA 01002, 413-549-8118, amherst@earthaction.org, www.earthaction.org

Fields of Hope Teacher’s Guide: Educational Activities on Child Labor

Authors/educators
Sonia Rosen and Solidarity Center staff
Organization/publisher
American Center for International Labor Solidarity (AFL-CIO), sponsored by U.S. Department of Labor
Primary audience
Middle school teachers (grades 6-8), but authors suggest the curriculum is flexible and can be used with other age groups
Curriculum and content
Guide consists of eight activities based on information and resources from the Fields of Hope web site, its links, and other on-line searches. Activities focus on definitions of child labor, a story of a day in the life of an agricultural child laborer, an overview of child labor around the world, youth activism on child labor issues, and the relationship between education and child labor. Activities involve participants in envisioning constructive actions (through letter-writing, debate, and role play activities). The teacher’s guide also includes an information sheet on the importance of education (from the Global Campaign for Education) and two schematic overheads outlining the causes of child labor, benefits of education, and the “Cycle of Poverty and Illiteracy.”
Contact
American Center for International Labor Solidarity (AFL-CIO), 1925 K Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20006, 202-778-4500, 202-778-4525 (fax), www.fieldsofhope.org

From Forge to Fast Food: A History of Child Labor in New York State, Vol. I & II,

Authors/educators
J.W. Greene
Organization/publisher
New York Labor Legacy Project / Council for Citizenship Education, Russell Sage College
Date of production/publication
1995
Primary audience
Junior high teachers, especially in New York state
Curriculum and content
Teacher’s guide contains units on child labor to be used in U.S. or New York State history courses for grades 7-8. Volume one (seven 1-3 hour lesson plans) covers child labor in the colonial period, in the context of slavery, apprenticeship, household production, the industrial revolution, and urban manufacturing and sweatshops. Volume two (four 1-3 hour lesson plans) covers child labor from the Civil War to the present, shifting to a focus on child labor as a political reform/public policy issue. Essays included in teacher guides are intended for teacher self-education/preparation, and so are suitable for adult readers.
Contact
Stephen Schechter, Council for Citizenship Education, Russell Sage College, Troy NY 12180, 518-244-2363

A Global Investigation of Child Labor: Case Studies from India, Uganda, and the United States

Authors/educators
Selena Lai (edited by Sarah Bachman)
Organization/publisher
Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE)
Date of production/publication
2001
Primary audience
Secondary school teachers and students; readings and some activities also suitable for adults
Curriculum and content
Three multi-part lessons built around detailed case studies of a street child in India, child soldiers in Uganda, and a migrant farm worker in the United States. Lesson One, “Understanding Child Labor,” introduces child labor according to UNICEF definitions and includes a knowledge assessment activity, analysis of complexities associated with sample child labor cases, small group work constructing a slide show on a particular form of child labor, and a homework reading assignment. Lesson Two, “The Complexity of Child Labor,” includes a “jigsaw” group activity in which students work together to present part of an assigned reading, a “team quiz” activity based on student-generated questions, and a homework writing assignment. Lesson Three, “A Closer Look at Child Labor: Case Studies from Around the World,” provides three detailed case studies to be distributed in packets to small groups, along with materials for each group to use in analyzing and constructing a presentation on their case. This is a very dense curriculum that contains a high level of factual detail and nuanced reading material; lessons could each potentially fill over a week’s worth of classes. Emphasis is on encouraging students to recognize particularities of each child worker’s situation as well as the “universality” of issues many child workers face in common. Readings and contextual information consistently emphasize the complexities surrounding child labor issues and potential approaches to mitigating its harmful effects; accompanying activities place information on complicated, unresolved issues in front of students and ask them to generate possible responses and solutions. Curriculum includes multiple reproducible handouts, prepared and reproducible transparencies for use in instructor presentations and student group work, “information cards” with questions and factual answers for use in classroom discussion, homework cards with short assignments, and activity cards, worksheets, and scenarios/case studies for students to use in group work. Curriculum guide concludes with a 20-page resource section.
Contact
Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE), Institute for International Studies, Encina Hall East, Ground Floor, 616 Serra St., Stanford CA 94305-6055, 800-578-1114, 650-723-6784 (fax), http://spice.stanford.edu, SPICEsales@forsythe.stanford.edu

Kids Helping Kids Teacher’s Guides: “Working for Our Dreams: Explore the World of Work and Children’s Rights Worldwide”

Organization/publisher
UNICEF (with the Children’s Television Workshop)
Date of production/publication
1998
Primary audience
Elementary and secondary school teachers
Curriculum and content
Two teachers’ guides, one for grades 1-5 and one for grades 6-12. Each guide contains a set of classroom discussion ideas and writing activities on child labor topics, and suggested student awareness-raising, volunteer, or UNICEF fund-raising/donation projects. Emphasis is on encouraging students to think about their own education, work, earnings/savings, and future jobs in relation to the lives, work, and poverty of other children around the world. Guides also include 2-3 reproducible worksheets for students and a sample letter and information sheet for teachers to send to parents regarding student volunteer or fundraising projects.
Contact
U.S. Fund for UNICEF, 333 East 38th St., New York NY 10016, webmaster@unicefusa.org, www.unicefusa.org/infoactiv/dreams.html

Lost Futures: The Problem of Child Labor

Authors/educators
Eric Rubin
Organization/publisher
American Federation of Teachers
Date of production/publication
1999
Primary audience
Teachers’ unions; elementary and secondary school teachers and students
Curriculum and content
Teacher’s guide with lesson plan accompanying a 16-minute video. Video gives an overview of the history of child labor in the United States, the current problem of child labor around the world, tells the story of Iqbal Masih, and shows how students in American schools have launched campaigns to end child labor and support education programs for working children abroad. Teacher’s guide includes a resource list, nine classroom activities, a short play, two short stories and several poems about child labor, and a documents section with information on legal definitions of child labor, FLSA, and full text of relevant international conventions. Around half the classroom activities are written exercises for students to complete individually; the other half are ideas for interactive discussions, debates, or creative projects.
Contact
American Federation of Teachers, International Affairs Department, 555 New Jersey Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20001, 202-879-4400, 202-879-4502 (fax), iad@aft.org, www.aft.org

New Hampshire Mill Girls and the Ten Hour Struggle

Authors/educators
Judy Elliott
Organization/publisher
New Hampshire AFL-CIO School-to-Work Outreach Program
Date of production/publication
1999
Primary audience
High school history students
Curriculum and content
This curriculum contains four parts in addition to extensive readings, handouts, suggestions for class discussions, lesson plans, and suggestions for speakers and videos. Part I compares employment conditions in New Hampshire in the 1840s and today. Part II explores the struggle of workers to attain shorter working hours in New Hampshire in terms of both the mill girls and workers in general. Additionally, Part II looks at strategies for achieving social change. Part III examines New Hampshire’s changing economic structure from historical and current perspectives. Finally, Part IV attempts to draw a comparison between contemporary Third World workers with the New Hampshire mill girls of the 1840s.
Contact
New Hampshire AFL-CIO, 161 Londonderry Turnpike, Hooksett, NH 03106

One-hour curriculum on international child labor

Authors/educators
Kevin Acers and members of the Oklahoma City RESULTS chapter
Primary audience
Middle School and High School Students
Curriculum and content
Contains information from 1997 UNICEF State of the World's Children Report, and a 12-minute video about Canadian boy who became anti-child labor activist.
Contact
The Peace House, 405-524-5577, opsnews@aol.com, Kevin Acers, 405-728-8066, acers@pns.com

No Place for Children

Organization/publisher
Hague Appeal for Peace
Primary audience
Elementary, secondary, and teacher education
Curriculum and content
Lesson plan focused on child soldiers and the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which makes children eligible for military service at age 15. Includes charts providing military recruitment ages in various countries and unofficial minimums practiced in countries currently at war, and very brief suggested discussion questions. This lesson is part of a draft manual compiled from “multicultural sources from all world regions” and based on the conceptual framework of the Hague Agenda.
Contact
Hague Appeal for Peace, Teachers College, Columbia University Peace Program, Box 55, 525 W. 120th St., New York NY 10027, 212-678-8116, www.haguepeace.org

Photographs of Lewis Hine: Documentation of Child Labor

Authors/educators
Linda Darus Clark
Organization/publisher
National Archives and Records Administration, “Constitution Community” web site
Date of production/publication
2000
Primary audience
Elementary and secondary school teachers and students
Curriculum and content
Lesson plan examines the history of child labor reform in relation to First Amendment rights. Plan provides brief historical biography of Lewis Hine and suggests eight classroom activities, including discussion, photo analysis, creative writing, and interactive computer group work. The on-line version of lesson links directly to 16 Lewis Hine photos in the NARA’s NAIL database.
Contact
The National Archives and Records Administration, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, 1-866-272-6272, 301-837-0483 (fax), www.nara.gov/education/cc/hine.html

Rebels in the Shadows Lesson Plans

Authors/educators
Robert T. Reilly
Organization/publisher
Pittsburgh University Press, Golden Triangle Books
Date of production/publication
2000
Primary audience
Elementary and secondary school students and teachers
Curriculum and content
Web page of lesson plans on labor history topics for use with the book Rebels in the Shadows (historical fiction for young readers based on the story of the Molly Maguires) includes three lessons on child labor: “Child Labor Laws Today,” “All Work and No Play,” and “Local Child Labor.” Lessons assign students a research task (identifying current child labor laws, identifying industries that depend on international child labor, or researching child labor in local history) followed up by a writing or presentation assignment based on findings. Lessons suggest on-line resources for carrying out some of the research, and on-line versions of lesson plans link directly to relevant sources.
Contact
University of Pittsburgh Press, Eureka Building, Fifth Fl., 3400 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh PA 15260, 412-383-2456, 412-383-2466 (fax), press@pitt.edu, www.pitt.edu/~press/goldentrianglebooks

Trade Unions and Child Labor

Organization/publisher
ILO Bureau for Workers’ Activities (ACTRAV)
Date of production/publication
2000
Primary audience
Trade unionists
Curriculum and content
Set of seven booklets:
  1. “Guide to the Booklets” provides overview of materials and suggested uses, including a draft agenda for a two-day workshop, suggestions for using the booklets in study circles and other group settings, and a series of group activity ideas for use with booklet materials
  2. “Union Policies and Action Plans to Combat Child Labor” introduces and defines child labor, reasons trade unions’ fight against it, and examples of trade union action
  3. “Fact Finding and Information about Child Labor” outlines steps to systematically collecting information needed for action on child labor
  4. “Campaigning Against Child Labor” provides models of trade union campaigns and tips on creating and distributing campaign materials
  5. “Collective Bargaining to Combat Child Labor” introduces international trade union movement focused on agreements with multinational companies, social clause and social labeling initiatives, and sample content of collective bargaining agreements addressing child labor
  6. “Using ILO Standards to Combat Child Labour” introduces core labor standards and other relevant ILO conventions and system whereby trade unions can use them as instruments in combating child labor
  7. “The Tripartite Structure to Combat Child Labour” suggests ways of working in partnership with governments, employers, and other trade unions in combating child labor. Discussion points, suggestions for action plans, activity guides, worksheets, case studies, and some reproducible sample/model campaign materials, songs and role plays appear throughout the booklets.
Contact
Bureau for Workers Activities, International Labour Office, 4, route des Morillons, CH-1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland, actrav@ilo.org

Violation of the Child’s Human Rights: “Street Children,” “Child Labour,” and “The Girl Child”

Authors/educators
Marita Ishwaran (edited by Caroline D’Souza and Jaya Menon)
Organization/publisher
Research and Documentation Centre, Justice and Peace Commission, Bombay
Date of production/publication
1999
Primary audience
Schools, colleges, and grassroots community groups
Curriculum and content
Three modules on children’s rights, excerpted from a larger Justice and Peace Commission human rights curriculum and adopted by the Asian Human Rights Commission as part of their on-line human rights correspondence course (see www.hrschool.org). Each module is designed to each fit a 35-minute class period, and content and case studies are focused exclusively on Asian countries, especially India. Chapter I, “Street Children,” introduces the UNICEF definition of street children, categories of street children, and provides several short case studies and testimonials from children. Chapter II, “Child Labour,” defines child labor according to Indian law, suggests major causes of child labor, and reviews national (Indian) and international efforts to eliminate child labor. Chapter III, “The Girl Child,” introduces the concept of gender discrimination and gives examples of how girls in India experience concrete forms of oppression, including premature and exploitative forms of work, and ends with discussion questions to accompany the video “Let Her Die” and a script of a role play for participants to perform. Each module ends with suggestions for group activities, suggestions to coordinate lessons with national holidays recognizing children’s rights, and ideas on how participants can connect directly with child laborers to offer support, carry out interviews, and develop action campaigns.
Contact
Asian Human Rights School, www.hrschool.org, hrschool@ahrchk.org / Justice and Peace Commission, Archdiocese of Bombay, Catholic Communication Centre, Archbishop's House, 21, Nathalal Parekh Marg, Bombay 400 001, INDIA. (91-22) 281 9219 (fax)

What do Working Children Want?

Authors/educators
Chris Doye
Organization/publisher
New Internationalist
Date of production/publication
1999
Primary audience
Secondary students and teachers; also suitable for older students and adults
Curriculum and content
Lesson plan designed for use with readings from July, 1997, special child labor issue of New Internationalist Magazine (on-line version of lesson plan links directly to the magazine issue at www.newint.org/issue292/content.html). Lesson asks learners to discuss views on work and child labor regulations in their own country, share reactions to stories told by working children from around the world in the magazine, discuss and predict “What do working children want?” based on their readings, and then compare their predictions with a “working children’s charter” written by child workers and published in the magazine.
Contact
New Internationalist, 55 Rectory Rd, Oxford OX4 1BW UK, 44-1865-728181, 44-1865-793152 (FAX), www.newint.org/index4.html, katherinea@newint.org

What is Child Labor?

Authors/educators
Sydney Donahoe
Organization/publisher
Family Education Network
Date of production/publication
2000-2002
Primary audience
Elementary school students and teachers
Curriculum and content
On-line lesson plan drawing on materials from ILO web site (including child labor quiz and Kids at Work page). Introduces ILO definition of child labor, suggests questions for brief discussion and further awareness-raising activities in conjunction with Labor Day.
Contact
Family Education Network, www.teachervision.com

Youth Rules

Organization/publisher
U.S. Department of Labor
Date of production/publication
2002
Primary audience
Youth, parents, employers, and teachers
Curriculum and content
Site contains a page directed at educators, linking to on-line resources on domestic child labor laws, the Department of Labor “Kids’ Pages,” and other related web sites and statistics that could be used in classroom discussions of child labor.
Contact
U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20210, 1-866-4-USWAGE, TTY: 1-877-889-5627, www.youthrules.dol.gov