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Annotated Curricular Resources on Child Labor and Global Issues

Approaching WTO Education

Authors/educators
Center for International Business and Research at the University of Washington, in conjunction with the World Affairs Council of Seattle
Organization/publisher
World Affairs Council
Date of production/publication
November 1999
Primary audience
Middle and High School Students, grade 6-12
Curriculum and content
Includes introductory readings to the WTO, multiple perspectives surrounding the debate, and four classroom lessons focusing on recent trade disputes.
Contact
World Affairs Council, 206-441-5910. Also available at: www.world-affairs.org/GlobalClassroom/GCResources.htm

Beyond Economic Growth

Organization/publisher
World Bank Group
Primary audience
Elementary and secondary students and teachers.
Curriculum and content
Student textbook, which draws on data published by the World Bank, is addressed to students, teachers, and all those interested in exploring issues of global development. It encourages learners to seek their own solutions to development challenges by exploring and discussing a broad range of critical development issues and focus on questions such as: What is development? How can we compare levels of development? What does it take to make development sustainable?
Contact
www.worldbank.org/depweb/english/beyond/global, dep@worldbank.org

Campaign for Global Fairness: Basic Presentation

Authors/educators
AFL-CIO Education and International Affairs Departments
Organization/publisher
AFL-CIO
Date of production/publication
2000
Primary audience
Unions
Curriculum and content
Instructor’s outline, handouts, and overhead charts for a one-hour popular education presentation subtitled “Make the Global Economy Work for Working Families.” Emphasis is on demonstrating how the global economy affects participants’ daily lives, defining economic terms and concepts, and introducing how key economic institutions affect workers around the world. Child labor is introduced as one of several labor rights issues affected by global economic policies. Chart on “Children Still Hard at Work” gives ILO statistics on child labor, and outline emphasizes how child labor abuses indirectly affect employment levels, wages, and organizing rights for all workers.
Contact
Greg Woodhead or Thea Lee, AFL-CIO International Affairs Department, 815 16th St. NW, Rm. 705, Washingtion DC 20006, 202-637-3907

Chocolate: A Fair Trade and Human Rights Unit

Author/educators
Dianne Clipsham and Letitia Charbonneau
Organization/publisher
Global Education Network
Date of production/publication
2003
Primary audience
Grades 6-10
Curriculum and content
This unit was developed, with the aid of the Canadian government, to look at the use of child labor in the world’s chocolate market. The educators chose the chocolate market in order to spark student interest. The curriculum attempts to develop a student’s understanding of child labor over a course of years. The unit provides resources for educators and students to better understand child labor.
Contact
Global Education Network, www.global-ed.org/cu-chocolate.pdf

Development Education Program (DEP)

Authors/educators
The World Bank Group
Organization/publisher
The World Bank Group
Primary audience
High School Teachers and Students
Curriculum and content
The Development Education Program online curriculum begins with an exercise that encourages students to explore the issue of “sustainable development.” The course then divides into learning modules under three categories: social (including population growth rate and life expectancy at birth), economic (GNP per capita), and environmental (access to safe water). Each learning module contains text, interactive exercises, charts, maps, data, case studies, photo, and research exercises.
Contact
The complete curricula can be found on the World Bank website at www.worldbank.org/depweb/english/sd.html

Down the Street, Around the World: A Starter Kit for Global Awareness.

Authors/educators
Shannon McLeod and Christina Houlihan
Organization/publisher
American Federation of Teachers
Date of production/publication
2003
Primary audience
Middle School and High School Students
Curriculum and content
The unit is designed to guide students through an exploration of issues facing the global community today, and to help them determine their own role in facing some of these challenges. Through research in one area of international concern, students will develop an understanding of the ways in which global and local issues are intertwined. The time required to conduct this unit depends on the way in which the teacher uses it--the materials could be squeezed into two weeks of intensive coursework, developed more fully into a month-long investigation, or woven throughout a course as an ongoing research project. The unit is divided into four phases with lesson plans, student handouts, reference information, and student background information. The first phase introduces the student into issues facing the global community. The second phase has students work in teams to explore in-depth issues facing the global community such as labor, trade, and migration. The third phase has students present their findings to their peers to give the class an overview of the issues facing the global community. Finally, the last stage attempts to draw together the ideas and themes that were developed over the course of the unit.
Contact
American Federation of Teachers, 555 New Jersey Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. 20001; www.aft.org/international/whatsnew

Fairtrade Education Guide

Authors/educators
Fairtrade, UK
Organization/publisher
Fairtrade, UK
Primary audience
K-12 Students
Curriculum and content
Lesson 1 is available on the website. This one-hour lesson seeks to raise students’ awareness of Fairtrade, help students understand challenges facing disadvantaged producers, and enable students to make informed choices about what they buy and how they can get involved in efforts to support Fairtrade. It includes interactive exercises and worksheets.
Contact
Fairtrade UK at www.fairtrade.org.uk

Fairtrade Fortnight: In Your School Action Guide

Organization/publisher
The Fairtrade Foundation
Primary audience
K-12 students or adults
Curriculum and content
This unit consists of two lessons designed to raise awareness for the Fairtrade label as an alternative to conventional trade and to help consumers make informed decisions. The first lesson is fifteen minutes and is designed to introduce the audience to Fairtrade growers and products. This lesson contains interactive activities to engage the participants. The second lesson lasts an hour and is intended to teach participants how to shop for Fairtrade products in an interactive setting.
Contact
The Fairtrade Foundation, Suite 204, 16 Baldwin’s Gardens, London, EC1N7RJ (UK); www.fairtrade.org.uk.

Global Issues Unit 4: World Trade

Authors/educators
SCoPE, Sample Curriculum Plans for Education (a State of Michigan internet resource initiative for educators)
Organization/publisher
State of Michigan
Date of production/publication
2002
Primary audience
Eleventh Grade Social Studies Students
Curriculum and content
In this unit, students explore international trade and its influence on governmental policy and working conditions around the world. They begin with an investigation of the role of trade in everyday life. Students then examine the role of international trade in historic conflicts between nations, with special emphasis on the American Revolution. Through readings they consider the United States’ current international trade policies and discuss possible global implications. Students use case studies to compare different perspectives on international trade by American workers and consumers. After investigating working conditions around the world, they explore products their families use to determine whether the production involved child labor or abusive “sweatshop” conditions. Students research and evaluate existing and pending legislation on child labor. After examining the effects of tariffs, quotas, and product standards on world trade, they engage in a trade negotiation simulation in which they represent a governmental delegation attempting to resolve a trade issue between the United States and the European Union. Through discussions and debates students attempt to reach a trade agreement and evaluate the position they represent in light of American values and national interests. The unit concludes with students examining and debating unilateral and multilateral solutions to economic, national security, and social issues arising from the growing interdependence on trade. Focus questions include: How does trade and economic interdependence shape government policy? Why do various segments of the American population have different views on trade and the world economy? What role does capitalism and free trade play in child labor and “sweatshop” conditions around the world?
Contact
A Sample Core Curriculum for Michigan Schools, found at:
www.michigan.gov/scope/0,1607,7-155-13515_13526_13530-38166--,00.html

Globalization and Resistance

Organization/publisher
Canadian Union of Postal Workers
Primary audience
Postal workers/union members
Curriculum and content
Popular education curriculum and part of CUPW Union Education Program. Includes group exercises, discussion points, and case studies on jobs, health, the environment, democracy, and social justice and introductions to international institutions and trade agreements, Canadian government positions on international trade, and labor organization responses to the global economy.
Contact
Canadian Union of Postal Workers, 377 Bank Street, Ottawa, Ontario K2P 1Y3 Canada, Tel: 613.236.7238,
Fax: 613.563.7861.

Globalization and Social Responsibility: Bridging the Real World and the Classroom

Authors/educators
Compiled and written by Global Source Education
Organization/publisher
Antioch University, Seattle, WA
Date of production/publication
2000
Primary audience
High School Teachers and Students
Curriculum and content
This Course Handbook was specially developed for Global Source Education's summer 2000 Teachers' Institute on Globalization and Social Responsibility in Seattle, WA. The resource contains source material on the WTO, child labor, the environment, military interventionism, selective purchasing laws, world music as a vehicle for engaging in global issues, and student participation in a new civics. The guide also contains two lesson plans called “Who is Making your Sneakers?” and “Coffee: Connecting Local and Global Economies.” Extensive readings for both educators and students is included, as well as resources for further inquiry.
Contact
Info available at www.globalsourcenetwork.org/lessonplans.htm

Globalization for Beginners

Organization/publisher
United for a Fair Economy
Date of production/publication
2001
Primary audience
Adults
Curriculum and content
Two-hour participatory workshop including group exercises, primer on the World Trade Organization, World Bank, and International Monetary Fund. Workshop concludes by giving participants action steps for joining efforts for fair trade and a healthful environment.
Contact
United for a Fair Economy, 37 Temple Place 2nd Floor, Boston, MA 02111, Phone: 617-423-2148, Fax: 617-423-0191;
info@faireconomy.org; www.stw.org/contact

The Global Workplace

Authors/educators
International Centre for Trade Union Rights
Organization/publisher
The International Centre for Trade Union Rights
Date of production/publication
2002
Primary audience
Trade union representatives
Curriculum and content
A course designed to educate union representatives about international issues. The course approaches the subject from a trade union rights perspective. Students are encouraged to join discussions while a tutor leads them through a flexible course structure. Materials include worksheets, reference materials, talking points, and resources – and a manual with background information on international issues. The course concludes with a role-play during which students get an opportunity to draw on the knowledge they have acquired and to explore the motives and forces involved when work “goes global.” The program is currently being piloted in the UK, but discussions are underway to produce the course around the world.
Contact
The International Centre for Trade Union Rights, UCATT House, 177 Abbeville Road, London SW4 9RL, program described on the website at www.ictur.labournet.org/Goingglobal.htm

International Economics: Focus

Authors/educators
National Council on Economic Education
Organization/publisher
National Council on Economic Education
Date of production/publication
1998
Primary audience
High School Students
Curriculum and content
You are a consultant deciding where to build a factory: What eight factors will you consider? That question sparks on this book’s 20 activity-based lessons covering such topics as calculating comparative advantage, using graphs to analyze international trade, understanding foreign exchange and balance of payments, evaluating trade barriers, gauging free trade (with Japan and NAFTA as counter examples), and assessing privatization. Lessons are fully developed (spelling out curriculum standards addressed, objectives, time and materials, procedures, and assessment) and incorporate reproducible handouts. 198 pages.
Contact
Social Studies School Service, www.socialstudies.com

International Trade: The Boeing Company and Auburn High School

Authors/educators
Mike Zecher and Joe McCuistion, Auburn High School
Organization/publisher
NW Regional Education Laboratory
Primary audience
High School Students
Curriculum and content
Students in U.S. History and International Relations at Auburn (Washington) High School collaborated on a simulated problem involving the purchase of aircraft from The Boeing Company by the Chinese government. The curriculum revolved around a central question: What should U.S. trade policy be regarding Boeing sales to China? Students looked at the sale from the following perspectives: city, state, and national government; labor and human rights organizations; and business and industry. Project tasks ranged from analyzing Adam Smith’s theories and Amnesty International reports to interviewing Boeing employees and labor union representatives. Teams of students researched, prepared, and presented position statements representing a cross section of opinions on issues such as most favored nation status and global competitiveness. Based on the data gathered, the class devised a trade policy. Throughout this process, students compared economic theory with market realities. The project culminated in a presentation of this policy, complete with a feasibility study, to a panel of business, labor, and community representatives.
Contact
Mike Zecher and Joe McCuistion, Auburn High School, 800 4th Street N.E., Auburn, Washington 98002; (253) 931-4880.

Labor Awareness Program

Authors/educators
The Greater Kansas City Labor Awareness Program
Organization/publisher
The Institute for Labor Studies, a joint project of The University of Missouri-Kansas City and the Longview Community College in consultation with the Greater Kansas City AFL-CIO.
Date of production/publication
2002
Primary audience
High school students
Curriculum and content
The curriculum is made up as three sections and fifteen lessons. It includes handouts, activities, and lesson plans. The Institute for Labor Studies additionally encourages the use of speakers and workplace tours. The first section focuses on the history of the labor movement in terms of the struggle for dignity, child labor, racism, and collective bargaining. The second section examines the twenty-first century workplace with an emphasis on new technologies, a field trip to a high tech workplace, child labor in the developing world, workers’ perspectives on the global economy, and finding solutions in the global workplace. Finally, section three looks at workers’ tools. This section examines the rights of workers, conflict resolution, training opportunities, organizing, and the debate surrounding labor issues.
Contact
Institute for Labor Studies /University of Missouri Kansas City, 211 Haag Hall, 5100 Rockhill Rd, Kansas City, Missouri 64110, Phone: 816.235.1470, Fax: 816.235.2834, maynem@umkc.edu ; www.umkc.edu/labor-ed.

Labor Standards in the Global Economy

Authors/educators
Jeffrey Vincent
Organization/publisher
Indiana Labor Studies Program
Primary audience
Elementary school students
Curriculum and content
Outline and power point slides for a 45-minute presentation to Indiana elementary school classes. Emphasis is on introducing students to the concept and history of labor standards, and how such standards will apply to them during their working lives in today’s economy. Child labor is introduced as part of United States labor history, and as one of several abuses unions sought to reform in the early twentieth century. Child labor-related slides include four Lewis Hine photographs and a comment on child labor from Samuel Gompers, all of which focus on the history of child labor and child labor reform in Indiana.
Contact
Jeffrey Vincent, Indiana University Division of Labor Studies, Poplars 628, 400 E 7th St., Bloomington IN 47405-3085, 812-855-9082, 812-855-1563 (fax), vincent@indiana.edu , www.indiana.edu/~scs/programs/labor00

Lessons Learned from the WTO Experience

Authors/educators
Global Source Education
Organization/publisher
Global Source Education
Date of production/publication
December 9, 2000
Primary audience
Educators and K-12 Students
Curriculum and content
Handbook developed for the one-year anniversary of the WTO meeting and protests in Seattle, which helped ignite a global debate on trade and human rights. This packet of readings and curricular suggestions is designed to help educators prepare for classroom discussions on trade. Readings examine the debate from both defenders and critics of free trade.
Contact
Global Source Education at www.globalsourcenetwork.org/lessonplans.htm

Marketing to the Global Teenager: An Interdisciplinary Unit

Authors/educators
Keith Lucero and Martha Riley
Organization/publisher
NW Regional Educational Laboratory
Primary audience
High School Students
Curriculum and content
Students in Denver Public Schools enrolled in this course explore how the international market affects them and their international counterparts. One of the many course goals is to familiarize students with the political relationship of the United States and its citizens to other nations and to world affairs.
Project-based learning is an integral part of this course. Students choose and define a product to be produced in Colorado, identify a country in which to sell that product, and prepare a briefing booklet of information about the country and the product for a company representative. Based on the item to be marketed and the chosen country, the following information is contained in the booklet: currency, customs, transportation, holidays, dress, visas, geography, and general protocol. In the process of writing up their projects, students must acquire and analyze information in many forms, including statistical data, primary sources, graphs, and geographic variables.
Contact
R. Keith Lucero, East High School, 1545 Detroit Street, Denver, Colorado, 80206-1508; (303) 394-8300; or Martha Riley, Eaglecrest High School, 5100 S. Picadilly Street, Aurora, Colorado 80015; (303) 699-0408.

Pacific Rim/Contemporary Mathematics

Authors/educators
Sandy Christie and Carol Mills, Eisenhower High School
Organization/publisher
NW Regional Educational Laboratory
Primary audience
High School Students
Curriculum and content
This course is built around the premise of a trade fair where students work to develop the most profitable trade program for a particular country. This simulation requires students to make projections from compiled data, examine cultural differences, and analyze policies governing international trade. When investigating their topic, students examine economic, cultural, geographic, and social issues.
Contact
Sandy Christie and Carol Mills, Eisenhower High School, 702 S. 40th Ave, Yakima, Washington 90908; (509) 573-2600.

Rethinking Globalization: Teaching for Justice in an Unjust World

Authors/educators
Bill Bigelow and Bob Peterson
Organization/publisher
Rethinking Schools Press
Date of production/publication
2002
Primary audience
Elementary and secondary school students and teachers and adults
Curriculum and content
Book of readings and teaching ideas devotes a full chapter to child labor: “Kids For Sale: Child Labor in the Global Economy.” Chapter includes 15 pages of poems, short readings, first-person testimonials, stories, and photos, all formatted to be reproducible as student handouts. Chapter concludes with information on establishing student clubs to work on child labor or related issues beyond the classroom, and a series of ideas for using the readings as part of classroom discussions, writing assignments, or group activities. Emphasis is on approaching child labor in the context of global economic issues, and as a problem that cannot be separated from a larger spectrum of human and labor rights abuses. Other chapters of the book (e.g., “The Global Economy,” or “Global Sweatshops”) contain activities and role play exercises on closely related issues that could be adapted for use with child labor content. Book concludes with a 40-page resource section.
Contact
Rethinking Schools, 1001 E. Keefe Ave., Milwaukee WI 53212, 414-964-9646, 800-669-4192, 414-964-7220 (fax), RSBusiness@aol.com, www.rethinkingschools.org

Stop Sweatshops: An Education/Action Kit

Authors/educators
Adria Vasil
Organization/publisher
Maquila Solidarity Network
Date of production/publication
2000
Primary audience
Community groups, adults and college students
Curriculum and content
Kit contains an “Educator’s Handbook,” “Action Tools” for researching companies and planning public awareness-raising events/activities, and reproducible issue sheets. Four-page issue sheet on “Child Labour and the Rights of Young Workers” introduces the issue of illegal child labor within context of spectrum of labor rights abuses and problems faced by legally employed young/teen and adult workers, examines why and where children work, gives brief examples, lists “Do’s and Don’ts” for child labor action, and introduces relevant ILO conventions. “Educator’s Handbook” provides tips on workshop design, planning, and adaptation for a range of audiences, followed by facilitation tips and suggestions for answering questions. Handbook concludes with three interactive activity ideas and reproducible graphics (none deal explicitly with child labor but could be adapted to include child labor examples).
Contact
Maquila Solidarity Network, 606 Shaw St., Toronto ON, Canada, M6G 3L6, 416-532-8584, 416-532-7688 (fax), info@maquilasolidarity.org, www.maquilasolidarity.org

Stop Sweatshops Curriculum

Organization/publisher
UNITE!
Primary audience
Elementary and secondary school teachers and students
Curriculum and content
Series of five interactive activities introduces students to conditions faced by children and adults working in the garment industry. Focus is on encouraging students to compare their own experiences as workers and consumers with examples of garment workers’ experiences, and on recognizing connections between their clothing and the workers involved in its production. Series of activities culminates with students researching a selected clothing company’s labor practices; curriculum includes research guide, questions for companies, web resources, and contact information for companies and organizations for use in this project. Curriculum does not treat child labor as a separate topic, but includes examples of youth or children workers.
Contact
UNITE!, 1710 Broadway, New York NY 10019, www.uniteunion.org

Sweatshop Series Facilitators Guide (Global Citizens for a Global Era: Sweatshop Series)

Authors/educators
Susan Gage, Richard Morrow, Stacey Toews
Organization/publisher
Victoria International Development Education Association (VIDEA) / sponsored by Canadian Auto Workers’ Social Justice Fund, Canadian International Development Agency, and International Fund of the British Columbia Teachers’ Federation
Date of production/publication
1999-2001
Primary audience
Secondary school students and adults
Curriculum and content
Three booklets – “Sweatshops: Clothes,” “Barbie’s Trip around the World,” and “Behind the Swoosh” – (approximately 30 pps. each) accompanied by a Facilitator’s Guide. Booklets give detailed overviews, statistics, and case studies of documented labor abuses in the apparel industry, toy industry, and Nike’s international production chain. Each emphasizes a particular industry’s historical and present-day position within the global economy, suggests how economic and trade policies have created current conditions, and includes cases of sweatshop worker resistance to working conditions and activist initiatives in support of improved working conditions. Child labor is not treated as a separate issue, but is considered several times in the context of profiles of the predominantly young workforces in these industries. Instances of specific child labor violations are noted at several points, and informal sector child labor and lack of access to education are mentioned as problems exacerbated by low adult/parent wages in these industries. Facilitator’s Guide contains 15 activity ideas to be used in conjunction with selections from the three booklets. Activities are grouped into three categories: “Why Should I Care?” (informing participants about problems and links to their lives); “How Can I Learn More?” (structured research tasks and group work); and “How Can I Change Things?” Each activity includes discussion questions and several include handouts and other materials needed for role plays, simulations, and activism projects.
Contact
VIDEA, 1921 Fernwood Road, Victoria BC V8T 2Y6, 250-385-2333, 250-388-5258 (fax), videa@home.com, www.members.home.net/videa

Sweatshops in the Global Economy Popular Education Workshop

Authors/educators
Amber Gallup and other members of Sweat-Free I.U.
Organization/publisher
“Sweat-Free,” Indiana University chapter of United Students Against Sweatshops
Date of production/publication
1999
Primary audience
College students and adult community groups and unions
Curriculum and content
Workshop guide includes facilitation tips, checklist for presenters, sample sign-up sheet for participants, outline for 30-minute interactive workshop, and sample record-keeping/follow-up sheet. Workshop does not focus on child labor as a separate topic, but introduces it as one of several labor abuses categorized as human rights abuses. Focus is on introducing concepts (“global economy,” “sweatshop,” etc.), framing sweatshop abuses as a human rights issue, and encouraging participants to recognize connections between themselves as consumers and/or workers and the working and living conditions of sweatshop laborers.
Contact
Sweat-Free I.U. Education Committee, 812-339-6431, agallup@indiana.edu

Ten Plagues of Globalization

Authors/educators
Jose Victor Aguilar and Miguel Cavada
Organization/publisher
Equipo Maiz / Epica Books
Date of production/publication
2002
Primary audience
Adults
Curriculum and content
Includes 71 pages of popular education materials designed to provide an overview of economic justice issues related to economic globalization, including: poverty and inequality, unemployment, labor rights, women’s rights in the global economy, environmental issues, and other human rights concerns.
Contact
Epica Books, 1470 Irving Street N.W. Washington D.C. 20010, email: epicabooks@igc.org

Today’s Globalization

Authors/educators
Dan Horowitz de Garcia, Walda Katz-Fishman, Christi Ketchum, Jerome Scott
Organization/publisher
Project South
Date of production/publication
2002
Primary audience
High school students and adults
Curriculum and content
Toolkit with materials for use in workshops ranging from two hours to a whole day includes workshop narrative, group exercises/games, handouts, readings, and glossary of terms. Introduces participants to international trade and financial institutions and to terms and concepts such as “structural adjustment” and “neoliberalism.”
Contact
Project South, 9 Gammon Ave., Atlanta, GA 30315, Phone: 404-622-0602; Fax: 404-622-6618; general-info@projectsouth.org; www.projectsouth.org

Trade Is...

Authors/educators
International Trade Education Foundation and Washington Council on International Trade
Organization/publisher
International Trade Education Foundation
Primary audience
Middle School and High School Students
Curriculum and content
A multiple media teaching tool designed to help students understand international trade. The program contains videos, lesson plans, and a CD-ROM designed to make trade issues engaging, accessible and real for teachers and students.
Contact
Information available at www.wcit.org/tradeis.

Trade is Everybody’s Business

Authors/educators
Susan Aaronson
Organization/publisher
Close Up Publishing
Primary audience
High school students and adults
Curriculum and content
Topics covered include: Trade is Everybody’s Business; A Workers’ Perspective on Trade; A Consumer’s Perspective on Trade; A Citizen’s Perspective on Trade and Democracy; An Environmentalist’s Perspective on Trade and the Environment; A Citizen’s Perspective on Trade and Economic Interdependence. 64 pages
Contact
Close Up Publishing, 1-800-763-3131

Unpacking Globalization – A Popular Education Tool Kit

Authors/educators
Highlander and the Economic Literacy Network (ELAN)
Organization/publisher
Highlander
Primary audience
Adults
Curriculum and content
145-page curriculum contains seven popular education sessions which tackle aspects of the global economy: women and work, Asian financial crisis, privatization, sweatshops.
Contact
Highlander, 1959 Highlander Way, New Market, TN 37820

Work in the United States

Author/educators
Michael Krasner
Organization/publisher
Child Labor Education and Action Project
Date of production/publication
June 2002
Primary audience
Grades 10-12
Curriculum and content
The purpose of this unit is to help students understand child and sweatshop labor. In order to facilitate this understanding, the curriculum helps students to distinguish between different types of work and to evaluate work situations in terms of fairness, safety, and the life chances of the persons involved. The unit contains eight lessons asking students to gather information through personal interviews and Internet research. Each lesson plan contains background information, time requirements, needed materials, instructional formats, objectives, and suggested strategies and procedures.

Work in the World – A Guide to Work Issues Across the Planet

Organization/publisher
International Labour Organization (London) and National Union of Teachers
Date of production/publication
2001
Primary audience
Teachers and students 14 and older
Curriculum and content
Curriculum deals with a range of issues about work at international and local levels. It includes material on globalization, unemployment, work and family, migration, and a wide range of other issues, including one section devoted to child labor. The book is relevant to a variety of curriculum areas including Social Studies, Citizenship, Economics, Business Studies, History and Geography. Guide includes explanatory text, classroom activities, glossary terms, case studies, and resource lists.
Contact
ILO London, +44.(0)20.7828.6401, Fax: +44.(0)20.7233.5925; london@ilo-london.org.uk; www.ilo.org/public/english/region/eurpro/london/projects